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, international donors have pledged more than 1 billion euros for those displaced by the civil war in the country. united nations secretary general said the fund raising goal had been exceeded. >> representatives from nearly 60 countries met in kuwait to examine how to help with the millions of people who have fled the fighting within syria and the 700,000 who are refugees in neighboring countries. the french military advance against islamist fighters in northern mali continues to make rapid progress. emma the troops have taken control of the airport over the weekend. virtually unopposed, the -- two other cities of the weekend. the french are now negotiating with tuareg rebels, who say they have control. >> onto economic news, and financial markets have been on the rise these past few weeks as hopes have grown that the worst of the year of crisis has passed. today in spain, there's a reminder that things are very bad still for millions of people. revenue figures show spain sank even deeper into recession in the final quarter of last year with the economy contracting faster than ever. more than on
in east london, the euro cafe is serving up british toast and italian coffee, and the patrons are discussing the european question. >> we should be allowed a say at some point. >> we are definitely part of europe, and i think we will be too small outside of europe. >> but not all londoners are as pro-eu as those in the euro cafe. >> we definitely need to renegotiate our position. it certainly detracts from what we could contribute to our own economy, which is sorely needed. >> i know we can still means -- retain a relationship with our members without necessarily the party. m a cameron's position is one of a strong britain in a more relaxed european alliance, and he says that is something he will fight for. >> david heyman is making his own position very difficult. britain's fate will hinge on its european partners. -- david cameron is making his own position very difficult. if they do not agree, britain is headed toward the exit door, and this is something the prime minister does not want at all. >> cameron's speech has been troubled for months, and battle lines are already b
banking giant as it post more than 2 billion euros in quarterly losses. >> and tornadoes batter six u.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied the existence of the vehicles, saying the israeli planes bombed a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are an
bankrupt. very soon if the entire country had gone bankrupt. due to the structure of the euro zone where countries without a central bank behind them needed -- bailout of the banks and where the banks needed to continue lending money to bankrupt states, -- there was a domino effect because of the banks that were untrustworthy and the untrustworthy countries that they were associated with. this was the point in which the european union refused to realistically look at the situation. they decided that it was better to act, that it was just a crisis of public debt, and they did not -- instead of accepting that they had a poorly designed a currency union, they decided to implement austerity packages to ponte economies that were on the brink of bankruptcy. securing their default, in this way they created a recession that was not necessary for us to have. and they insisted in doing. at the cost, at great human co cost. and at a terrible cost for democracy. ladies and gentlemen, understanding here before you today, and i'm very sorry, but i'm going to say but i have to say this, none of these l
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute britain can't work out os own special deal. the
of the european military system was for the euro and it was the work of franco-german relations. >> they paid tribute to the fallen of the first world war. germany and france would stand by one another. the current german and french leaders are hardly united in the struggle for stability of the european currency, but some say that is nothing new. >> there is one thing to take from 50 years since the treaty is that we do make a difference. but this is perhaps not the worst strategy for getting through the current crisis. >> for more, we have our correspondent from the parliamentary studios. franco-german relations have been put to the test over the last year. has it caused by problems to date? >> of course the two have had their cautious over the strategy meant in tackling the eurozone debt crisis. we know that merkel is very fond of talking about universality. the clashes have been stronger between other heads of government between france and germany in the past 30 years. it is so fundamental to the sense of their identity. any clashes will not seriously rock about. >> why not britain or any
. if these companies are going to want an ever closer union as a result of the problems created by the euro, why should britain not want to take advantage of the changing your pandemic to give britain a chance to become more competitive? the changes going to happen. we want that changed to be a direction that suits the british people. >> i can see you gesticulating. did you want to come in? >> we have become competitive within the european union. germany has given the example, we were able to become competitive. we of a higher debt ratio the most of the member states in the eurozone. higher unemployment questions. this has nothing to do with the european union, other countries have shown that you can be successful within the european union. here we would like to cooperate with britain, as germans we would like to have them in, but to change the conditions of the treaty, we would do better through legislation. >> dr. fox, you are on the record as welcoming this speech, but some will question what is your welcoming. for starters, we do not know what the renegotiated union would look like. on the one hand
. will israel bomb iran and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slo
cliff, is euro going to explode, so many covers of the euro bursting into flames. >> is japan going to get washington, d.c. into the sea or will this incredible debt burden just crush them? and the fact is that for the last four years, all of those risks, every single one has been overstated, overstated by people in the marketplace. emerging markets are actually much more unstable than that and yet. >> they are thought unstable. >> they are responsible to for two-third of the world's growth, about three quarte by e e of the decade, and yet these are countries that are much more volume tile, volatile and much more opaque. >> rose: let's talk about who they include, china, india, brazil, and turkey and -- >> some of them are doing reasonably well, some include the bricks but three of the bricks bricks are facing head wind greater than we have seen in the united states, not brazil, which is developing increasingly becoming more regularized but in the china and russia, and i go back to the beginning. >> ros the risk is what going to hpen to them? >> the risks are different for differen
policy response generally to the european union, the euro project, i should say. we have the euro group separately meeting. we have this little issue of cypress. in terms of gdp, it's little. politically, though, it could be much more significant. tie this altogether for us. how important is an essential change of power in germany to these continued effort to resolve the crisis in cypress or other member states? >> i think the key issue is that germany is a big importer from spain, italy and the periphery. if the german numbers weaken, we'll see that later in a periphery. >> especially through spain. >> ultimately, this is really an economic story. the periphery are a lagging indicator of what's going on in germany. my concern is sooner or later, these peripheral equity may start to be under pressure again. what are your positions on debt? >> i think at this stage we're still comfortable with the core. the reason, there's probably another risk off take his. whatever the reason behind it, it tends to protect the periphery, not the core. for example, france continues to perform very, very
equities at a five-year high, the euro rallying so prices being lifted by this different influences. melissa: thanks for coming on. we have another truth even if it is not what you want to hear. he made it sound good even though it is bad news. lori: anybody can understand behind the price target. that is a given. it makes it a little bit easier to digest. melissa: it still does not ease how much you're paying at the pump. facebook fourth-quarter peak district of the downgrades roll in. if the company's strategy working? lori: and the drugmakers, the big pharma names. stocks getting beaten down. and competition from generic. but there is still reason to be optimistic. next. . ... melissa: time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange and our own nicole petallides. what have you got. >> i'm looking at a market here that has been somewhat mixed. nasdaq is managing to squeeze out gains the dow dropped below 13,900. some names names weighing on the dow, united health care, bank of america. market breadth actually as i look at it, a
up closer to that magic 8000 market today. eurostoxx50 surged 1/3%. >> the euro is going for $1 u.s. 58. -- $1.3058. >> the free democrats are struggling. they're holding their annual meeting this weekend. they're under pressure to come up with something good. many in the party are skeptical that he house what it takes. they could very well crash out of the german parliament later this year for the first time. where exactly are they hiding? let's find out from our political correspondent. some blame their woes on this worsening. is that fair? >> they have not exactly prospered under his leadership. since it became party chairman a year-and-a-half ago, they have been booted out of four of the 16 state parliaments. polling figures are languishing below 5% meaning they would not get back into parliament in the upcoming election. whether he should bear all the blame for that, it is unclear, but many believe the party would be more attractive if they had a different leader. there was an opinion poll showing that he could possibly be replaced by a party veteran. >> what will happen up t
coming in stronger in the real star here. the euro topping 135 for the first time since april 2010. and strengthening even more after the gdp release. overnight in iasia, the nikkei p from 2010. the road map starts with the markets. today may be the day some milestones are hit. we're just about 2% away from dow 14,000. a level we have not traded above since october 17th, 2007. the s&p 500 less than 4% below its october '07 record high. can the bulls overcome the news of the surprise contraction in gdp. >> anticipation building, at least certainly here for research in motion. that being the blackberry 10, will it be enough to sustain the run. we'll take a look. >> amazon shares rocketing higher this morning. investors looking past the revenue and weak guidance, focusing instead on the gains in operating in gross margins. shares are set to open at record highs. >> look at chesapeakchesapeake,d of directors announcing the founder retiring in april. >> we do begin with a stunning gdp report. the economy contracted to 0.1% in the fourth quarter. first decline since 2009. this as we rema
countries of the euro zone hit a record high in november according to figures released under an hour ago. nearly 12% of 330 million people in 17 countries were unemployed. that means 19 million people are jobless. 2 million people at the same tired year ago. the european economy has been struggling with huge debts in the aftermath of the global banking crisis. rebels in northern myanmar say the army is continuing its air and ground assault against them. we have obtained these pictures of the fighting. the military reportedly attacked hilltop positions belonging to the independence army on monday. the only ethnic minority group that has not reached a truce with the government. the chinese government is reportedly looking to stop using controversial labor camps that critics say violate fundamental rights. the system has been used for years to silence political opponents. it allows chinese authorities to keep citizens locked up for years without charge or trial. now this report. >> with word of what could be a momentous decision, this man, supported by his wife, slipped away from authoritie
are moving a bit lower today. forex, the euro/dollar is one to watch, up 0.1% today. 1.3330. people are talking about how the ltr payment amounts to tightening. the question then becomes for some of the weaker economies whether it's too strong. dollar/yen moving up today. the yen is weakening by about 0.1%. fitch is saying british banks could need more capital. this has certainly been a theme. something, in fact, out in davos. ross, maria and everyone has been asking banks do they play to raise more capital? ross, what do they have to say about that? >> well, look, there's a lot of folks. what was interesting is when we spoke to the barclay's ceo mr. jenkins this morning said the whole industry when they were growing revenues didn't have to worry too much about costs. now they have to focus on the cost side of the business, which we know they're going to have a transformal plan and that's what they're going to be doing, as well. . capital requirements, how much capital is right when you're still going through periods of contracting growth because, obviously, the higher capital you h
, there is some growing optimism that greece will remain in the euro. the greek stock market has soared over the last year from a little -- from a very low base. transport workers are staging another 24-hour stoppage today. a doctor strike has left hospitals functioning with emergency staff. this comes after the greek finance minister told us that the bbc that he was expressing optimism about the growth outlook. our correspondent tells us why these workers are striking. >> the humanitarian catastrophe that has unfolded here in the last few years is very real. does bear in mind the figures -- just bear in mind the figures. it is staggeringly high unemployment. you have hospitals running out of medicine. schools are running out of textbooks. you have kids who are now having to have food vouchers in schools because their parents cannot afford to feed them. homelessness and poverty are soaring. that is the real cost of greece 's financial crisis, and it is very dramatic inedeed. >> let's move on. some of you think it's too early in the day. it's got to be 6:00 p.m. somewhere. today, half-year re
of japan would take further monetary easing measures. the yen came under pressure against the euro on friday, the currency rose to the 114 yen level. that's more than 14 yen higher than when the year started. analysts predict the yen's decline is likely to continue for some time. investors are now focusing their attention on what japan's central bank will do when it's policy making panel meets next month. now let's check on the stock markets in other parts of the world. european stocks are trading in a tight range, investors are keeping an eye on the ongoing u.s. budget talks. london's ftse 100 is trading at 5945. in frankfurt the dax is down about .4 percent at 7625. in paris the index there is down about.8% trading at 3644. earlier in the day asia stocks were higher almost across the board. today was the last trading day the year in many markets. south korean shares ended 0 high pressure 49% higher. mainland china stocks rose touching higher levels in more than six months. the hang seng closed at its peak for 2012. here in japan business leaders have urged prime minister shinzo a
are seeing a bit of strengthening right now. 88.79 for dollar/yen. euro/yen is looking at 118.55. >>> on to stocks, asian stocks mixed. nikkei down 0.4%. investors got a clearer picture of the boj's monetary policy. in terms of active trading at this time, european stocks looking to the downside right now. investors are cautious ahead of the release of bellwether u.s. corporate earnings on the day. london down a fraction. paris's cac 40 losing about 0.25% at this time. >>> shipment of flat screen televisions showed the steepest decline last month. they say 6.5 million units were shipped in 2012. that's down 67% from the year before. it was the second straight year-on-year decline. many japanese consumers bought flat screen tvs ahead of the switch over to digital broadcasting. sales have declined since then, leading to a drop if shipments. they say tv makers must develop new features or services to stimulate fresh demand. >>> that is going to wrap it up for biz tonight. let's check in now on the markets. >>> u.s. diplomats are trying to punish north korea for firing off a rocke
provided little market direction. dollar/yen at 88.29. we're seeing the euro is weaker against the yen. euyou're 0/yen at 117.79. >>> the labor union for japan's regional government workers is calling for the withdrawal of the central government's plan to reduce tax grants. the state government wants to cut local tax grants from fiscal 2013 starting this april. it's partly designed to slash regional government workers' wages by an average of 7.8%. the chairman of the all-japan precede tech furl and municipal workers union told reporters wednesday the plan is unacceptable. >> translator: this one-sided policy that the state is going to implement unilaterally has been drafted by skipping all the labor management negotiations. >> tokanaba said local governments are striving to cut workers to deal with the shortage of funds even though they're faced with more tasks in the their everyday work. he said they include social security issues and environmental protection measures. tokanaga added some municipalities have even pressed ahead with their own wage cuts. >>> that is going to do it for b
center, and, oh, yes, the pound sterling at odds with the euro. markets up more than 4% year to date. my next guest says while some investors are still on the sidelines, we're beginning to see a little bit more interest. joining us now with his outlook for the markets and the economy, of course, chief investment strategist for ubs wealth management, mike ryan. mike, good to have you here. >> good to be here. lou: a lot of fun in the european union. start there. we're not hearing so much about the collapse of the e.u., david cameron has other ideas, but the reality seems to be that things are quieting down a bit over there and not influencing our markets nearly so much. >> i think that's fair. i think what we're seeing, really, in the eurozone is an absence of mall las. the last couple years, an existential crisis, would the euro and player survive? a lot has been taken off the table by the posture of the european central bank saying we're standing behind the sovereigns. where does the growth come from? the real extreme risk event is eliminated. lou: and implied or at least indirectly bac
exclusive next. ashley: first, look at how the dollar is moves now against foreign currencies. the euro up against the dollar. the pound up against the dollar. euro 1.31 testing recent highs, and meanwhile, up against the green back unless you have the mexican peso, we'll be right back. lauren: i'm lauren green with your fox news minute. stranded after the coast is now under tow. successfully pulled from the island where it ran aground in a vicious storm a week ago. the rig is being toed at four miles per hour approaching the alaska coast where crews can determine if there's damage. shell says no evidence that the vessels' 150,000 gallons of fuel leaked into the ocean. the set dates to hear arguments in two gay marriage cases. california's proposition 8 on same-sex marriage will be heard march 26 #th, and the defense of marriage act is heard the following day on march 27th. new violence in syria after president assad's declaration that he will not step down in a public address, he announced only he dictates the end of the civil war, a 21-month conflict costing more than 60,000 lives so far
the u.s. dollar and you are seeing strength in the euro, weakness in the dollar. we will be right back. >> 25 minutes past the hour your fox news minute, 20 injured and two debt in a massive highway pileup in detroit, 30 vehicles involved in the crash south bound i 75 in detroit. white out conditions being blamed for the accidents which occurred two hours ago. severe weather has been impacting the country from the midwest to the southeast to the east coast. syriac is threatening to retaliate and is warning of a surprise response to israel's air strike near damascus. u.s. officials say is really jets struck a convoy shipping weapons to lebanon for the islamist militant group hezbollah. syria says israel hit a military research center. that hostage standoff in rural alabama alabama continues this morning. deron contact with the suspect to the retired truck driver holding a 5-year-old boy in an underground bunker. the man grabbed the boy off of a school bus tuesday after shooting and killing the bus driver. those are your headlines. now back to cheryl casone and dennis is hanging out ther
probably years and years to resolve. in the short term, the u.s. you can in the long term, the euro crisis is very substantial. >> let's add one more concern there apparently seems to be new concerns about brazil, a country that is supposed to be the economic dynamo, but now apparently seeing growth slowing. what's happening? >> brazil seeing trouble now. their main export is iron ore to china. with the slowing growth in china, china has now a surplus of iron ore, they are seeing less sales. but brazil has a lot of other things that might be helpful in the long run. they have the presalt oil, which could be billions and billions of barrels of oil that they will start coming on stream in the next five or ten years. they have a very strong agricultural economy. brazil actually, in the last quart earthquake the third quarter, grew much slowerer, .6%, the u.s. grew at 3.1% the third quarter. brazil has a way to go hopefully, able to rebound p >> hopefully indeed. all like to rebound. hal sirkin, a partner at the boston consulting group, oversees foreign markets. thank you very much. >> you're
of the effort to abide by a new euro zone for a balanced budget. >>> back here at home. country's top diplomat is back on the job at least for a while. james rosen tells us secretary of state hillary clinton is off the disabled list to fill the remaining time. >> the selling presented her from a gift from all of us. she said, as you know, washington is contact sport. inside it was a football helmet with the state department seal and also a football jersey that said clinton on the back and on the front it says number 112 which symbolizes the number of countries she has visited as secretary of state. she loved it. she thought it was cool. being hillary clinton she wanted to get back to business. >> reporter: that meant ordering state department officials to get cracking on implementing all the recommendations for enhanced security that was proposed by the accountability review board that investigated the attacks in benghazi and clinton remains committed to testify about benghazi before she leaves office. >> she is prepared to do it at open session. >> at no point again this morning did we see an
they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere there is a sense of caution. in pwc's annual global ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had go
of six points. the euro gaining, and that helmont about a percent on the dollar, which finished at a 52- week low as a matter of fact. gold finishing up over $19 during today's trading session. u.s. be chief economist maury harris joins us now. meanwhile, immigration and customs enforcement suing the government for refusing to let the men forced the law. nationalize council is also here. and israel unilaterally attacking key syrian assets and an overnight bombing. former pentagon official is also our guest tonight. would you want to begin with the u.s. economy shocking the experts in shrinking for the first time since the recession. fox news iran house correspondent has our report. >> less than two weeks that the president said his second inaugural address that an economic recovery had begun to let the congress -- commerce departments and not so fast. slow growth slashed economic growth from three pa 1% to-1 to the persons in the fourth. they downplayed the report and give republicans part of the blame. >> consumer spending has been rising. >> comments about using the threat of across-t
will leave the euro zone or know despite all of the very elaborate fixes worked up to keep countries like greece from going completely under the problem of growth remains. and as long as europe is not growing then the fundamental economic problem here remains. the unemployment rate for the entire euro zone rose to a record high of 11.8% for november. that is up from 11.7% from october. but up from 10.6% a year ago. these are images of italians lining up to fill out forms for jobs. it's not uncommon to hear young italians say that they simply feel that the culture is skewed against them, not making way for them in this economy. prime minister mario monte passed legislation to make it easier for people tow start u to start up their own companies because youth unemployment is at 37%. some people are thinking better to make jobs for themselves than wait to be hired. spain has the word unemployment problem with a staggering rate of 26.6% for november, as unemployment rises you question how much longer governments can stick to their austerity programs. and the problem is with people losing jobs
ministers, with the imf, with the world bank issues, and most importantly now, with the euro zone and the crisis there. >> excellent point, andrea. that was always part of the job, but it never mattered as much as it has since the financial crisis. look, there is a club of central bankers, there's a club of finance ministers. there's sort of overlapping circles within that club. jack lew is not known to come part of that club. for one central banker to call another in the middle of a crisis and say, hey, we're going to do this and be able to talk on the phone and to really address global financial issues in a hurry, i'm not saying jack lew can't be part of that. i know he also has spoken with a lot of these people in the past. he has talked to business executives on a pretty regular basis. as for his priors, he is not a member of that club. >> now, if he does have the chops to come up with a budget deal and real entitlement reform, and coming from a liberal to progressive background, having worked for tip o'neill, and i was told started out in politics in new york city with the la
and something about the world. did you see this poster from the e.u. showing all of the symbols of the euro? it showed a cross, star of david and so on and a hammer and sickle. there is a bit of an outcry from the lithuanians. and i ask why does it take the lithuanians, why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the persecuted under communism to object ourselves? white -- why would we leave it to them? i am relaxed about these symbols. we see a guy what they cccp with hammers and sickles and i once did a study on this on a simple magazine piece and some people say it's proof. it's kind of funny. you know, you don't see the pictures on t-shirts. it's just a t-shirt. as andrew daniels points out if we only took one good picture in this life he looks like a moon star and he got his cheekbones just right but it wasn't all that much, honestly. this is all regarding chambers, but he was a witness and a truth teller and it was really hard for him to forsake not popular approval but the approval of the people that mattered was colleagues and journalism and what we might call the liberal establ
today when alcoa reports after the closing bell and unemployment in the euro area hit a record 11.8%. red alert. the united states could default on its debt in five weeks in congress doesn't raise the debt kree ceiling. half a month earlier than expected. america could be in default as early as february 15th and almost certainly before march 1st. despite extraordinary measures taken by the treasury department to delay that from happening. on that day, the luu.s. will ha $9 billion coming in to the treasury's coffers. $52 billion going out. committed spending, including social security checks, paying f active duty military. that's what they are fighting in washington. how to cut that spending. >> that math does not add up. it cannot work. >>> so it wasn't exactly point/counter point. because piers morgan didn't say much when he sat down with alex jones, the guy who created this petition to have piers deported because is he an outspoken advocate of guns and gun control. jones went completely into rant mode last night. here is what he said. >> i'm here to tell you, 1776 will commence
talking about for weeks and it's been a home run, the euro/yen. we're not at the best levels of the day, but it is a friday. at least on trading floors, fridays have something in common. usually a little evening up with the markets. maybe look for some of these currency trends to run out of gas at least on a day trading basis. >> thank you, rick. don't forget the lift on china, gdp. sharon? >> the gainer here, leading the gains in the commodity sector based on that data out of china on growth industrial production, also keep your eye on what is happening in terms of the precious metals. we're looking at gold prices that have dipped a little bit here. not able to meet that resistance at the moving average. but silver continues to take off here. silver is actually the gainer for the week. the biggest gainer in the commodities complex for the week. we're looking at silver, actually silver coins running out of the u.s. there's so much investor demand for them. that's the story a lot of traders are talking about this morning. we're also keeping an eye on the wti oil price after it hit a four
, euro survived the big crisis. is there some optimism there? >> reporter: well, schwab, head of the world economic forum, optimistic smiling, says the euro didn't collapse, europe didn't fall apart, there's economic growth in the united states, there's room for optimism. i can tell you if you talk to the ceos, most of the people are ceos and in business, they are not optimistic. there is a deficit of confidence, and that's because you have budgetary problems in the united states, you have the eurozone problem, you have china, india slowing down. these other issues are very much on their agenda. so, you and i, as the week will go on, will distill this into what really they're talking. at the moment, the one word to keep in mind, risk. where it lies at the moment. >> and if they think that it's risky, business people and they're trying to get a sense of where we are with the economy if they think it's risky, how is that impacting us? everyday folks here who are looking at their, you know, paychecks and homes and wondering if it's going to change, if it's going to get better. >>
this morning. >> earnings season kicks off today. we just learned the unemployment in the euro area hit a record high. >> imagine unemployment at 11.8%. i mean, this is troubling for people in europe, our biggest trading partner as a zone. and another reason why it's so important, because europe has been in the midst of austerity, cutting budgets, cutting spending, cutting benefits. and it's driving unemployment higher. and as we enter into this big debate in this country about cutting spending, cutting benefits, what are the things to take away from that for the united states? also a debt ceiling alarm bell from the bipartisan policy center saying the treasury department's going to run out of room on the debt ceiling earlier than we thought. february 15th, they say. that's the "x" date when we can't pay all of our bills, when we literally only have that date $9 billion coming in, and we have $52 billion in bills. imagine that in your own household. if you had $9 billion coming in and $52 million going out. when you look at it, it's staggering. i think we have a chart on the left. that'
journal news to the euro news in less than seven days. they don't give a damn. they issued a public statement linking the atros it that happened in connecticut. anybody with any sense our heart goes out. you do everything we can. >> gregg: why did they do that. you mentioned a statement given by janet hassen who is publisher issuing a statement. armed guards, one of our rules is to reported publicly available information on timely issues. we knew publication of a database would be controversial but we felt sharing information about gun permits on the air it was important in the aftermath of the newtown shooting. as a justification -- does that even make sense? >> doesn't make any sense whatsoever. they did it to sell papers and this is violation. this is an unwarranted invasion of privacy. freedom of information is to have an open, accountable government. not to invade people's privacy. i have victims of domestic violence who went off the grid to protect themselves. they were exposed a couple days before christmas by this editorial board. our cops, police officers, they put gang mem
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